Carolyn Savage

Carolyn is a professional writer, proofreader, and editor living in Bend, Oregon with her husband and two pre-teen daughters. She has a background in wildlife management but switched to writing and editing when she became a mother. With her experience working for a small publishing company, as a freelance proofreader, and as a mother she shares insightful stories that support parents and grandparents.

She is the daughter of Raising Families co-founder Rick Stephens and holds the rank of black belt in taekwando. In her free time she loves reading fantasy novels, learning to craft from her enormously talented children, and then teaching what she’s learned to her enormously talented grandmother.

Posts by Carolyn Savage

Goal Setting for Kids: 6 Steps to Success

Goal Setting for Kids: 6 Steps to Success

Age: 6+Time: 15+ minutesMaterials: paper and pen or pencilFocus: life skills - goal setting for kidsGoal setting for kids is a great way to help your child set themselves up for success in the New Year. When you write down your goals, you increase your chances of attaining them, according to a study done at Dominican University. Showing your child how to set goals is also a great way to help them build confidence, become self-motivated, learn to reflect, and become more independent. All of these skills will help your child throughout life.Steps for Goal Setting for Kids Decide on the
Family Media Plan

1 Way to Make a Family Media Management Plan Work

Age: 8+Time: at least 20 to 30 minutesMaterials: paper and penFocus: creating a family media plan for the whole familyParents and kids never have the same ideas when it comes to screen time. The kids want more; the parents want less or none at all. Follow this surefire way to get everyone on the same page and make a family media management plan the whole family can agree on.Purposefully Choosing TraditionsWhen kids have ownership over something, they are more invested in the process and less likely to complain or break rules. Although it may seem counterintuitive, you want your kids
talking about traditions

Talking about Traditions: 1 Simple Way to Bond

Age: 2+Time: variesMaterials: noneFocus: fostering open lines of communicationTalking about traditions can be a great way to bond as a family. With the holiday season quickly approaching, now would be a great time to talk about the traditions your family celebrates.Purposefully Choosing TraditionsTake some time to think about the traditions you celebrate as a family. Then think back to the ones you celebrated when you were a child. Were there family traditions that you would have happily passed on? As an adult, have you purposefully put an end to those traditions? Or maybe there were traditions you enjoyed, but you decided
Parent-Teacher Communication: 5 Ways to Strengthen It

Parent-Teacher Communication: 5 Ways to Strengthen It

Age: 5+Time: variesMaterials: phone or email accessFocus: communicationAs a new school year starts, you can make sure your child gets the education they need this year by being an involved and supportive parent. One of the ways you can do this is by making sure there is parent-teacher communication throughout the year.Ways to Strengthen Parent-Teacher CommunicationThere are five simple ways to make sure your parent-teacher communication is strong. Meet your child’s teacher. Meeting your child's teacher doesn’t mean you have to volunteer in the classroom. It does mean that you should try to have a face-to-face meeting with the teacher, though.
2 Ways to Apply Knowledge to Real Life

2 Ways to Apply Knowledge to Real Life

Age: 5+Time: variesMaterials: depends on activityFocus: applying learning to real-world experiencesYour child’s job is to learn. They start learning the day they are born. Your job as a parent is to help them learn what they’ll need to know to be successful in life. One way you can do this is to help your child apply knowledge to real life once they start school. If you can help your child apply what they learn in the classroom to real-world experiences, you’ll be helping them build the skills they’ll need in life. How many of you have kids who complain about having to